A raid on a Marrickville business has prompted calls for the full legalisation of X18+ rated material in NSW.
Police raided two warehouse units on Carrington Rd last Wednesday alleged to be used by a business selling adult products, and seized more than 1000 X-rated DVDs. Some unrated material was also allegedly found.
Police claim the X-rated DVDs were being sold over the internet by the company.
The raid came about as part of a joint operation between NSW Police and the federal Attorney-General’s Department, acting on information received by that department’s Classification Liaison Scheme.
X-rated material is not illegal under Australian federal law, however, under state laws the material may be owned and viewed but not sold.
Australian Sex Party president Fiona Patten questioned why the Attorney-General’s Office participated in a raid on material it had classified.
“How can you have the same agency approving films for the general public on the one hand and then helping police prosecute people for selling these films?” Patten asked.
Patten said the operation would result in a significant cost to the taxpayer.
“Twelve police officers were taken off community policing for a day. They will spend at least another two weeks processing and storing the films ready for court and will have to pay $800 each to have them classified.
“The taxpayer is being asked to spend well over $100,000 to prosecute an ‘obscenity’ case where the films have been checked and classified by Commonwealth censors and are legal on the internet.
“I would like all NSW MPs to have the honesty and integrity to stand up and say if they have ever purchased and watched this material and the reason they support continued prohibition.”
NSW Greens leader Lee Rhiannon told Sydney Star Observer it was important for the sale of X-rated material to be legalised to prevent money going to organised crime.
“The legal ambiguity regarding X18+ non-violent erotica only encourages a black market in the industry,” Rhiannon said.
“It is estimated this is worth at least $200 million a year in Australia.
“An Interpol report found the money from the black market in such films finds its way into the funding of terrorist groups and organised crime.”
Rhiannon said with the ban on X-rated material so rarely enforced, non-violent material could often be found in petrol stations and regular video stores where minors could be exposed to it.
The Greens will be putting motions before the NSW Parliament to legalise X-rated material and to restrict the sale of non-violent erotica to adult stores.

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