There are times of the day that feel as though the world is standing still.

There are times of the day when the world pulls you against your will.

Just a few decades behind us, in stark reality, Coco, a small child nursed in her mothers arm when the hot wind blasted through the city, melting time into a singular instant. Blazing over the city, that moment has now become suspended for eternity.

To a few months back, a story book technicolour scripting opening with the same moment on the clock face. The moment the saviour arrives, time has begun again.

Coco, a survivor of the Hiroshima atomic bombing, relayed her story of when time stood still. How a blast of light and heat destroyed her family and her life.

Recalling in tears as an adolescent, she was asked to disrobe to American scientists as she participated in their medical examination of survivors.

Coco was so deeply humiliated by that act on her spirit, she broke down recalling her embarrassment. Yet she had withstood an atomic bomb.

An amazing descriptor of how we are so fragile, yet in some ways so resilient as humans. How dignity and respect are valued by us as beings. Pain is but a physical moment, yet destroying our values can take a lifetime to heal.

In the final moments of the documentary, Coco acknowledges her humiliation and her suffering were of use to those in the Chernobyl disaster years after. Proud tears stream down her smiling face.

Back to the story book characters where the raven haired victim meets her dark enemy in the school yard. Both stories converge in sentiment; one real, one make believe. The most powerful weapon to avenge your enemy.

Forgiveness.

INFO: You can follow John Meyer on Twitter: @daddydearest_ and on Facebook: DaddyDearest

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