Upon entering a quaint little antique shop in a small Tasmanian town named Geeveston a few years ago, I was struck with the mass of old-world images that were staring back at me.
There were tea containers made of tin from the 1950s, small vases crafted from original bubble glass in bright cartoon colours, even an Australian Women’s Weekly from 1956 (with Princess Grace of Monaco on the cover).
It was not so much an antique store as a time capsule. I could have gone mad buying up masses of charming throwbacks to an era most of us know only from re-runs of I Love Lucy, or movies about men who discover they are sick with this “monster” (i.e. they’re gay).
However, exposing yourself to the hoarding bug can be a dangerous thing. It’s nice to fill your space with personal items that mean something to you, but there is a need to differentiate between what looks good on a shelf, and what looks better in a box under the couch.
Travelling overseas is a great way to acquaint yourself with all the world has to offer and, if you can’t afford a trip, let someone else do it for you. Tim Hitchins Upon entering a quaint little antique shop in a small Tasmanian town named Geeveston a few years ago, I was struck with the mass of old-world images that were staring back at me.
There were tea containers made of tin from the 1950s, small vases crafted from original bubble glass in bright cartoon colours, even an Australian Women’s Weekly from 1956 (with Princess Grace of Monaco on the cover).
It was not so much an antique store as a time capsule. I could have gone mad buying up masses of charming throwbacks to an era most of us know only from re-runs of I Love Lucy, or movies about men who discover they are sick with this “monster” (i.e. they’re gay).
However, exposing yourself to the hoarding bug can be a dangerous thing. It’s nice to fill your space with personal items that mean something to you, but there is a need to differentiate between what looks good on a shelf, and what looks better in a box under the couch.
Travelling overseas is a great way to acquaint yourself with all the world has to offer and, if you can’t afford a trip, let someone else do it for you. Tim Hitchins is host of TV program Daytrip Designer, which takes him to some of Europe’s most happening cities picking up the very best 20th century design pieces.
Screening on Foxtel’s Discovery Travel & Living channel, the show is an excellent example of where and how to find collectibles from different periods of history.
However, for those with an edgier approach to filling their space, you cannot go past the plethora of quirky home and collectibles shops right here in Melbourne.
Village Idiom in the heart of Yarraville in Melbourne’s inner west is full of strange and loveable pieces (e.g. retro tin toys), while a stroll through Fitzroy is bound to have you carting shopping bags on your trip home.
The thing about collectibles is no one can tell you what or where to buy.
Sure, you can go for the modern look or the retro throwback look but, if it’s not coming from your inner designer, then it’s always going to have that dental surgery feel.
Don’t be afraid to pick out some really odd items – just make sure you don’t overdo it with the itsy-bitsy bits. TV and magazines are great for inspiration, but only you know what you really love.
From bnews – www.bnews.net.au is host of TV program Daytrip Designer, which takes him to some of Europe’s most happening cities picking up the very best 20th century design pieces.
Screening on Foxtel’s Discovery Travel & Living channel, the show is an excellent example of where and how to find collectibles from different periods of history.
However, for those with an edgier approach to filling their space, you cannot go past the plethora of quirky home and collectibles shops right here in Melbourne.
Village Idiom in the heart of Yarraville in Melbourne’s inner west is full of strange and loveable pieces (e.g. retro tin toys), while a stroll through Fitzroy is bound to have you carting shopping bags on your trip home.
The thing about collectibles is no one can tell you what or where to buy.
Sure, you can go for the modern look or the retro throwback look but, if it’s not coming from your inner designer, then it’s always going to have that dental surgery feel.
Don’t be afraid to pick out some really odd items – just make sure you don’t overdo it with the itsy-bitsy bits. TV and magazines are great for inspiration, but only you know what you really love.
From bnews – www.bnews.net.au

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